Black Milk With more than a decade and a half of industry experience and a rich catalog of recordings, Black Milk has successfully transitioned from one of hip-hop’s young sensations to a trusted virtuoso with a uniquely well-rounded pedigree as a producer, rapper, and performer. Black Milk’s DiVE EP (August 2) is a continuation of 2018’s powerful and politically-charged album FEVER. It finds him taking a survey from the ledge, preparing to plunge into a sea of change. “DiVE represents me looking ahead at 2020,” Black shares. “Stepping into this new decade, I want to have a mentality of progression. Once 2020 clicks in, I want to leave a lot of my old ways, traditions, and mentalities behind.” Listeners of FEVER may have sensed this energy with the self-awakening “unVEil,” the pivotal “eVE,” and the EP’s transitional genesis, “DiVE.” Across 11 new songs, Black Milk lights a path for where he plans to venture with his art. “I’m always going to have my standard and aesthetic. That’s why I’m not really afraid to step outside of any box because my taste will always keep me grounded,” he says. Single “Black NASA,” featuring Sam Austins, focuses on those who must fuel their own journey to become stars. “It represents a place where I—and many people of color are from. We have to make something out of nothing, as opposed to people who are handed the tools for success.” Without compromising substance, the song’s polished sound piques an array of playlists. Meanwhile, “If U Say,” featuring BJ The Chicago Kid, sees two nostalgic Midwestern artists confronting the present-day with a cohesive blend of crisp bars and soulful singing. Through his transformation, Black Milk travels with some Detroit talent deserving of recognition, including Sam Austins, Phil Swish, and his younger brother, rapper MAHD. Over the past 15 years, Black Milk has amassed a dynamic portfolio. After scoring his first credit for Slum Village as a teenager in 2002, he worked closely with the group and co-produced much of their next two albums. His self-released, full-length Sound of the City (2005) led to an independent deal, before international attention for the Soul-sample-driven style on his proper solo debut Popular Demand(2007). Five additional solo rap albums followed (Tronic,Album of the Year,No Poison No Paradise,Glitches in the Break,If There’s A Hell Below, FEVER), as well as an instrumental LP (Synth or Soul), and a live effort (The Rebellion Sessions) with his touring band Nat Turner. The sprawling and versatile discography also features collaborative LPs (including Black and Brown with Danny Brown as well as Random Axe with Guilty Simpson and the late Sean Price), two singles with Jack White, plus production highlights involving Brown, Kendrick Lamar and Earl Sweatshirt (“Really Doe”), and recent songs for Mick Jenkins and Marlon Craft. Through it all, Black Milk is widely recognized as one of music’s most acclaimed live acts as well as an elite artist who has always embraced creative evolution and change.
Black Milk With more than a decade and a half of industry experience and a rich catalog of recordings, Black Milk has successfully transitioned from one of hip-hop’s young sensations to a trusted virtuoso with a uniquely well-rounded pedigree as a producer, rapper, and performer. Black Milk’s DiVE EP (August 2) is a continuation of 2018’s powerful and politically-charged album FEVER. It finds him taking a survey from the ledge, preparing to plunge into a sea of change. “DiVE represents me looking ahead at 2020,” Black shares. “Stepping into this new decade, I want to have a mentality of progression. Once 2020 clicks in, I want to leave a lot of my old ways, traditions, and mentalities behind.” Listeners of FEVER may have sensed this energy with the self-awakening “unVEil,” the pivotal “eVE,” and the EP’s transitional genesis, “DiVE.” Across 11 new songs, Black Milk lights a path for where he plans to venture with his art. “I’m always going to have my standard and aesthetic. That’s why I’m not really afraid to step outside of any box because my taste will always keep me grounded,” he says. Single “Black NASA,” featuring Sam Austins, focuses on those who must fuel their own journey to become stars. “It represents a place where I—and many people of color are from. We have to make something out of nothing, as opposed to people who are handed the tools for success.” Without compromising substance, the song’s polished sound piques an array of playlists. Meanwhile, “If U Say,” featuring BJ The Chicago Kid, sees two nostalgic Midwestern artists confronting the present-day with a cohesive blend of crisp bars and soulful singing. Through his transformation, Black Milk travels with some Detroit talent deserving of recognition, including Sam Austins, Phil Swish, and his younger brother, rapper MAHD. Over the past 15 years, Black Milk has amassed a dynamic portfolio. After scoring his first credit for Slum Village as a teenager in 2002, he worked closely with the group and co-produced much of their next two albums. His self-released, full-length Sound of the City (2005) led to an independent deal, before international attention for the Soul-sample-driven style on his proper solo debut Popular Demand(2007). Five additional solo rap albums followed (Tronic,Album of the Year,No Poison No Paradise,Glitches in the Break,If There’s A Hell Below, FEVER), as well as an instrumental LP (Synth or Soul), and a live effort (The Rebellion Sessions) with his touring band Nat Turner. The sprawling and versatile discography also features collaborative LPs (including Black and Brown with Danny Brown as well as Random Axe with Guilty Simpson and the late Sean Price), two singles with Jack White, plus production highlights involving Brown, Kendrick Lamar and Earl Sweatshirt (“Really Doe”), and recent songs for Mick Jenkins and Marlon Craft. Through it all, Black Milk is widely recognized as one of music’s most acclaimed live acts as well as an elite artist who has always embraced creative evolution and change.